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Understanding Resurrection Through Art

Understanding Resurrection Through Art

By Everest Harvey

Hey SSP! My name is Everest, I was the Spiritual Life Coordinator for the Environmental and Housing Justice team this summer. As you likely know, the theme this summer was ‘Arise.’ This theme followed the cycle of a resurrection – death, waiting, new life, and moving forward. One activity we did as a part of my program was the following three-part project. To try it for yourself, get two pieces of paper and a glue stick.

“The theme this summer was ‘Arise.’ This theme followed the cycle of a resurrection – death, waiting, new life, and moving forward”

Part One

Think about something in your life that ended. Write or draw about it on your paper, try to take up as much of the paper as possible, use color, etc. Don’t worry about the drawing being “good,” it can be as messy and abstract as you want, you will be the only one who sees it. Fill up the space on the page with extra words or scribbles or shapes that describe how you felt during or after whatever you’re describing.

Part Two

Tear up your drawing into pieces, as many as you want, checking in with yourself and how you feel as you do this. Allow yourself to feel like you’re letting something go.

Part Three

Take the pieces from your drawing and make a collage/mosaic on your other piece of paper. This can look like anything. As you are piecing together your new work of art, remind yourself that sometimes endings can make way for something new. Reflect on what you learned from the ending you had in mind when you created your original piece, and what this new piece of art means to you.

This activity captures one of the main themes of the summer – even if an ending is painful and feels final, it is making room for something new and beautiful. Resurrection is all around us, and the model set by Christ’s resurrection is recognizable in our own lives if we take time to look.

 

Editor’s Note: You can implement this activity (and others like it) with your own group using SSP’s Arise curriculum, available on the online store. Stay tuned for more news on how SSP is ‘arising’ back to in-person programs! We can’t wait to explore faith and build community alongside you again.

The SSP Songbook: Make Your Voice Heard!

The SSP Songbook: Make Your Voice Heard!

by Kate Grobey, 2019-21 staff alum

Greetings SSP community! As we wrap up our 2021 summer program, we are grateful we got to see many of you online, and we joyfully anticipate seeing more of you next year!

While we have been unable to gather in person, SSP’s HQ and summer staff have been collaborating on several projects behind the scenes, in preparation for future in-person programs. One of those projects is revisiting SSP’s beloved songbook. So far, we’ve come up with a lot of ideas for what we’d like to improve before next year! These include:

  • Compiling training resources for song leaders
  • Providing chord modifications and charts for more accessible playing
  • Adding instructions for movement and SSP-style singing
  • Considering carefully how songs align with our theology, traditions, goals, etc.
  • Pruning out songs that are past their time to make room for more songs we love!

Here’s where you come in! We’d love to hear from the SSP community. What do you love about the songbook? What would make it even better? Are there any songs you’d like to sing at SSP? Use this Google form to add your suggestions and submissions.

Editor’s Note: We can’t wait to sing together in-person again! Attend our virtual Town Hall on September 8 to hear more about these opportunities.

Youth Advisory Council

Youth Advisory Council

In the fall of 2020, SSP created a Youth Advisory Council (YAC) to develop leadership skills in teenagers and ensure youth have an active voice in shaping SSP’s programs. Eight YAC members from across the western US participated in the inaugural council – they are excited to welcome the 2nd council!

2020-2021 Youth Advisory Council

Details about YAC:

– All high school aged youth are invited to sign-up by August 8, 2021 for the 2021-2022 school year.
– YAC meets monthly for 1 hour via Zoom. Plan for an additional 1-2 hours helping lead and participate in online programs and other initiatives (like ZZP with SSP: for youth, led by youth).
– Once a year, YAC will gather in-person for a retreat. SSP will pay for travel costs, food, and lodging.

Three YAC members will also go on to serve on SSP’s Board of Directors in the subsequent year, acting as a liaison between YAC and the board. These youth have the same voting privileges and responsibilities as adult board members.

Take some time to compose your answers to the essay questions below, limiting your responses to about 200 words. We advise you to draft and save your responses in a separate document to avoid losing your responses. Essay questions:

  1. Please describe some of the memorable experiences you have had with SSP. How and why has SSP been a formative and important experience for you?
  2. Why do you want to serve on SSP’s Youth Advisory Council?
  3. What skills and strengths do you bring to YAC?
Summer Theme: Environmental & Housing Justice

Summer Theme: Environmental & Housing Justice

By, Austin Jones, Site Director

This summer, SSP is centering topics that connect us to community partners that we have previously served with. While we are not able to serve in-person, we have incorporated voices from these communities to help us keep our relationships strong for years to come. 

“We have incorporated voices from these communities to help us keep our relationships strong for years to come.”

Our team’s theme, “Environmental and Housing Justice,” addresses some of the most important issues facing not only SSP’s partner communities but all of our home communities. We are working closely with community partners from Lake County, Chiloquin, San Diego, and Smith River to share about their communities and to highlight the advocacy work already taking place. We hope discussions on this topic will empower participants to learn more and positively impact not only the communities SSP partners with, but their own communities as well.  

“We hope discussions on this topic will empower participants to learn more and positively impact not only the communities SSP partners with, but their own communities as well.”

I have had personal experiences as both a volunteer and staff member in Chiloquin and Smith River. My first trip to Chiloquin was in 2015 as a volunteer and it was within this community that I first started taking interest in environmental justice. SSP’s partnership with the Chiloquin community gave me a way to see advocacy efforts at work, inspiring me to be proactive in any ways I can. 

“My first trip to Chiloquin was in 2015 as a volunteer and it was within this community that I first started taking interest in environmental justice.”

In 2018, I served in Chiloquin as a staff member and we worked with Terra Kemper, a park ranger at Collier Memorial State Park, to help plant trees. In 2020 Collier State Park was impacted by wildfires, and while we cannot help plant trees like in summers past, we are excited to connect with Terra this year, along with our other community partners, to listen, learn, and find out how we can contribute and do our part.

Editor’s Note: Join Austin and his team in advocacy this summer as a participant or Staff-in-Training!

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We are asking SSPers of all backgrounds to submit creative content so we can share a library of resources for community building in this season!

 

SSP Content Submission Form